Case Studies

Client Stories

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The Four Quadrants - Most issues for mentors and consultants can be allocated to one of four categories: corporate development, finance, logistics and strategy. Each title includes a myriad of sub-themes. The case studies presented here illustrate how despite the complexities of a growing business, practical solutions are available.

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  • All
  • Corporate Development
  • Logistics And Delivery
  • Strategic Development
  • Hidden Secrets of Loan Applications

    I have applied for and received many loans for clients. Whatever the amount and reason, I warn my clients that such requests lead to the same requirements. The application process demands that you understand exactly why you need the money and how you will pay it back. In other words, before being awarded a loan, you are forced to answer questions you may have preferred to ignore, such as who are your competitors; what is the expected upturn in sales and how will it be achieved; why will new equipment cost so much.
    • Follow The Money
  • “Why Do I Need a Revenue Model?”

    Isaac had been self-employed for nearly thirty years. His accountant was happy, and he kept aside a healthy salary for himself. Yet he was working 70 hours a week and he could not see a way out. In the first meeting, I established that Isaac had never studied business and his prices had remained the same for years, while he offered an elite service in his field. Within weeks, the pricing model had been altered upwards. Hours per client were curtailed. And he barely lost one customer.
    • Follow The Money
  • “I Don’t Need to Budget as I Deal in Cash”

    I have witnessed several clients, especially those new to commerce, who refused to plan their cash balances. Their excuse? Why bother, if you can remember everything and the bank account is healthy. However, their assumptions are invariably unreliable. The crunch arises when expenses are met, just, but there is no money left for the boss. My mentoring explores how as firms grow, there are more factors to forget. That includes the flow of money, which becomes too complex to manage in one person’s head.
    • Follow The Money
  • The Retail Chain That Tried to Beat the Bank

    I spent a year working with a small chain of shops. A family business, the top team refused to initiate a marketing strategy. Stock was kept high;egal cases were allowed to drag on, wasting time; Resulting in banks becoming increasingly reluctant to issue more loans. I convinced my client to draw up a detailed budget and future cash flow analysis. For all the skillful talk and explanations, they could not escape the fact that with their current structure the numbers stayed in the red. To address this, they recruited a top sales person and saved their chain.
    • Follow The Money
  • Successful Investor Pitches

    If you have a high-tech start-up, you know that sooner or later you are going to have to pitch investors. At such meetings, I find that many entrepreneurs spend too much time doing the talking, and usually concentrating on detailing their technology, which most people fail to comprehend. I encourage the techies that I work with to enter any such presentations with a validated business model. This is where my successful clients stand out in seeking the attention of the people with money, because the technology may be a “wow”, but it is sales that do the real talking.
    • Corporate Development
  • Developing an Effective Website

    Some very talented accountants formed a partnership to appeal to a niche market. They planned to develop a low cost website with minimal input and planning, a common mistake. My coaching convinced them of the importance of investing time into positioning themselves properly to potential customers, including devoting time and energy into their marketing and website.
    • Corporate Development
  • Identifying Target Markets

    Tourism is a notoriously temperamental industry, with political circumstances causing unexpected cancellations or sending customers looking for alternatives. A tour guide approached me, asking for help with his revenue stream. I asked him for his definition of an ‘ideal customer’. The answer was too brief to be useful. In other words, my client had lost his ability to identify which part of the market he was targeting. A new focus helped redirect his marketing, and he is now too busy to meet me.
    • Strategic Development
  • Negotiating for Successful Sales Closings

    Selling hardware is never an easy game. The competition is often strong. The sales cycle can be laborious. And then there are numerous internal factors that are beyond your scope. This is typical of many sectors of commerce. My client often found themselves close to the finishing line, but never quite crossing it. What my client has learnt is to agree on specific terms early on in the selling cycle. These ensure that when the prospect is presented with a purchase deal, there are no more reasons to delay. As for my client, sales are growing from year to year.
    • Strategic Development
  • Cultural Differences

    In an era of globalization, it is easy for many of us to justify how and why we can get along with people from other countries and to understand their requests. Judging whether an Israeli is bluffing, or explaining the context of a British understatement, or justifying an American outburst of anger is one of the tasks that I face regularly. For example, an Israeli web designer was unable to fathom the despair of a client, born outside of Israel. The result was a shouting match via emails. There was no effective communication until I stepped in.
    • Corporate Development
  • Time Management

    The issue of time management comes up at least once a day. It is staggering how many people are running businesses, yet have little concept of how to allocate their time to numerous tasks. One of my key challenges for clients is to encourage them to consider a printed diary instead of a digital one because paper diaries allow you to see at a glance what you have planned ahead and what you can truly achieve in any given amount of time. Most also allow for a clear separation between tasks and meetings. For the record, every week, I fulfill over 90% of all planned tasks.
    • Corporate Development
  • Vision – The First Key Towards Growth

    One of the first things I teach is that you have to know what you want to achieve. This is called having a vision. Many CEOs turn round to me and say that they just want to make money, to which I suggest that they fill out a lottery ticket. Those clients of mine that spend time developing a defined vision – not a simple process for many – are often the ones who succeed the best. In one specific case, it led to my client finishing up with most of his customers, as he realised he was losing money and in a sector which he did not want to be.
    • Corporate Development
  • Human Resources

    I am approached by many clients who offer salaries for employees on a commission basis or through a flat structure which includes overtime. While working with one manufacturer, it took me a long time to convince the CEO that the best way to ensure a happy customer base was by building up a loyal workforce, who will give you everything. Part of that process included a pay scale that allowed for advancement. Commissions and overtime do not achieve that and therefore often result in de-motivation.
    • Logistics And Delivery
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Actual names have been changed upon request